The Real Technology of Indiana Jones

By Deeveepix on Flickr
By Deeveepix on Flickr

It’s here!  I’m getting ready to go to Austin, TX to speak on a panel at South by Southwest, an annual music conference that has grown to include film and interactive media.  When I lived in Austin I would go check out hundreds of bands that were playing all over town, but this will be my first time to attend the interactive conference.  This is the first panel dealing with digital archaeology to appear at the conference, and I’m excited to be a part of it.  If you happen to be going to the conference, the panel is on Monday, March 16th, at 11:30 in Room B.
Title: The Real Technology of Indiana Jones

Organizer:
Adam Rabinowitz, University of Texas at Austin
Panelists:
Stuart Eve (University College London), Bernard Frischer (Rome Reborn), Colleen Morgan (University of California at Berkeley), Adam Rabinowitz, moderator (University of Texas)
Description:
Archaeologists no longer rely on whips and fedoras; they now use a range of sophisticated digital tools to collect information in the field and study it in the lab. Too often, though, this wealth of information meets the same fate as Indy’s discoveries, locked away in digital ‘warehouses’ where no one can see it. The archaeologists on this panel present different projects that use web platforms and open-source approaches to bring digital archaeology out of the warehouse and into the public eye. Learn how archaeologists are using interactive media to open their data and processes to the public; discuss the creation of an online archaeological community in Second Life; and explore ancient cities across space and time using publicly-available online tools.

//sxsw.com)

The Mejlby Stone

This museum display, a rune stone lit and animated with the story it contains, is an amazing digital production produced by a team from Denmark.  In the presentation that I’m getting together, I argue for more of this kind of work to be done by archaeologists, but it’s pretty amazing when a well-funded team of artists and technicians get together to produce a piece of digital art that is informed by history.  The digital chisel working its way across the stone was so much fun, and having the text spill out across the floor to make an interactive (though limited) interface was nothing short of inspired. I have to admit, part of me wishes that I could contribute my own little shadow puppets to the show.

Anyway, I thought I’d re-post, as it seems to have been missed by most of the major archaeology blogs and is related to a few points I’ve raised before.